Pathology

Introduction | Faculty & Staff | Courses

The department provides instruction for medical students in basic, systematic, and clinical pathology, which bridges the basic sciences with clinical medicine. It also makes available specialized topics in pathology to third- and fourth-year medical students, graduate students, and residents in pathology, as well as integrates and instructs pathology at the community hospitals. The University’s involvement in community hospitals allows this department to improve the postdoctoral residency program for training of specialists in pathology.

Pathology (PATH) is the study of disease. Instruction in pathology is given to undergraduate and graduate students,
medical students, and residents. Pathology 541 provides essential autopsy experience for all third- and fourth year medical students.
Third and fourth year medical students and residents may enroll in one or more of the Pathology 545, 670, and 699 courses. Instruction is
offered in laboratory medicine for the practicing physician, clinical pathology, anatomic pathology, clinical immunology, and pathology of aging, nutrition and/or alcoholism.

The department directs a residency program in anatomic and clinical pathology. The clinical faculty come from all the
community hospitals. Faculties are based at



Faculty members participate in the training of medical students and residents alike. They are also involved in several long-term research studies including on Ciguatera toxins, Rhodanese domain proteins found in mitochondria and bacteria, and proteomics related to cancer. Faculty provide gross and microscopic specimens for demonstration and clinico-pathologic correlations. In addition, clinical faculty members participate in seminars and give lectures along with the full-time and part-time faculty.



Publications:

Bocchetta M, Eliasz S, Arakelian De Marco M, Rudzinski J, Zhang L, Carbone M.
The SV40 large T Antigen-p53 complexes bind and activate the insulin-like growth factor-I promoter stimulating cell growth.
Cancer Res, 68: 1022-1029, 2008.



Carbone M, Pannuti A, Zhang L, Testa JR, Bocchetta M.
A novel mechanism of late gene silencing drives SV40 transformation of human mesothelial cells.
Cancer Res, doi:10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-082332, 2008. In Press.



Phone: (808) 692-1130
Address:
Pathology Department
651 Ilalo Street, MEB
Honolulu, HI 96813

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John A. Burns School of Medicine • University of Hawai`i at Manoa
651 Ilalo Street • Honolulu, Hawai`i 96813
© 2008