JABSOM Academics

Objectives for Graduation

Last Revised and approved by the Curriculum Committee on May 23, 2014
Approved by the Executive Committee on June 20, 2008


Graduates of the University of Hawaii John A. Burns School of Medicine are life-long learners. They apply their knowledge of biological and medical sciences, demonstrate a deep appreciation for the community, and communicate effectively in the care of their patients, particularly the peoples of Hawaii and the Pacific Basin. They practice medicine with the highest professional standards while maintaining their personal health and well-being. All medical students at JABSOM must demonstrate achievement of these objectives prior to graduation.

I.  Life-Long Learning Skills

Graduates will be life-long learners.


Following PBL tutorial, patient care interactions, or in anticipation of future learning needs, students will be life-long learners by:
  1. Listing important learning issues in the biological, clinical, populational, and behavioral domains and meeting these learning needs through self-directed study.
  2. Searching for and retrieving (from electronic databases and other resources) biomedical information, critically appraising this information, and applying it appropriately to patients and populations.
  3. Evaluating the knowledge base supporting good patient care, recognizing gaps between prevailing and best practice, and incorporating the principles of quality improvement to enhance patient care outcomes including patient safety.
  4. Evaluating their fund of knowledge, clinical skills, communication skills, and professionalism and responding proactively to meet or exceed learning needs.
  5. Showing increasing independence in their self-directed learning skills.
As measured by achieving a grade of "credit" in all required courses and 4th year electives, achieving of a satisfactory evaluation in all Preclerkship PBL tutorials, and the Triple Jump examination.

II.  The Biological Sciences

Graduates will understand the biological sciences underlying clinical medicine.


Students will apply the biological sciences to the practice of medicine by:
  1. Stating the scientific basis for disease and the role of translational research.
  2. Explaining the molecular, cellular, and biochemical mechanisms that maintain the body's homeostasis.
  3. Describing the normal structure and function of each major organ system and the human body as an intact organism.
  4. Explaining the various causes (genetic, developmental, metabolic, toxic, microbiologic, autoimmune, neoplastic, degenerative, and traumatic) of illness and the way in which they operate on the body (pathogenesis).
  5. Explaining the altered structure and function (pathology and pathophysiology) of the body and its major organ systems that are seen in various diseases and conditions.
  6. Applying new findings in the biological sciences to diagnosis and therapy.
As measured by achieving a grade of "credit" in all required courses and 4th year electives and achieving a passing score on the USMLE Step 1 Examination.

III.  The Care of Patients

Graduates will be able to care for their patients with increasing responsibility, and seeking and responding to appropriate evaluation and supervision.


When seeing a patient presenting with a concern or illness in the ambulatory or hospital setting, students will be able to care for that patient by:
  1. Approaching each patient with an awareness and sensitivity to the impact their age, gender, culture, spiritual beliefs, socioeconomic background, family support, sexuality, and healthcare beliefs may have on the development, diagnosis, and treatment of their illness.
  2. Applying clinical reasoning, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills.
  3. Performing a complete or organ-specific history and physical exam following an appropriate exam sequence and utilizing correct technique in a manner that reflects a clear understanding of the manifestations of common maladies.
  4. Respecting issues of modesty and personal space when interviewing a patient or performing a physical exam.
  5. Ordering appropriate diagnostic tests with careful consideration of the test properties, risks and complications, discomfort to patients, cost, and the patientís overall therapeutic goals.
  6. Performing routine procedural skills under appropriate supervision, with minimal discomfort to patients.
  7. Developing and implementing an appropriate therapeutic plan that takes into account efficacy, adverse effects, cost, safety, and compliance issues, in the context of the patient's overall goals, values, and cultural beliefs.
  8. Understanding the comprehensive care necessary in caring for patients with chronic conditions and disabilities.
  9. Recognizing and initiating therapy for acute life-threatening conditions.
  10. Educating patients, families, and other healthcare providers about health, illness, and the prevention of disease in a manner they can understand.
  11. Providing end-of-life care including pain management and guidance to patients and their families on end-of-life care decision-making.
  12. Incorporating principles of inter-professional patient care, especially in the areas of communication and patient safety.
As measured by achieving a grade of "credit" in all required courses and 4th year electives, and achieving a passing score on the MDED 541 Comprehensive Clinical Skills Assessment, and the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge Examination and the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills Examination.

IV.  Oral and Written Communication Skills

Graduates will be able to communicate effectively with patients, families and other healthcare providers.


When in a classroom, clinical, or other healthcare setting, students will communicate effectively with others by:
  1. Greeting patients warmly, eliciting relevant information, understanding the patientís perspective, responding to their feelings, educating them about their condition, and explaining further management.
  2. Utilizing rapport-building techniques, including open-ended questions, empathic listening, checking for understanding, validation, and appropriate eye contact, body language, and voice quality to attend to patients.
  3. Communicating with patients and family in a manner that conveys compassion and sensitivity to their feelings and concerns.
  4. Incorporating patient-centered and shared decision-making principles into their practice.
  5. Motivating patients to adopt new or different behaviors to promote their health.
  6. Orally presenting cases clearly and concisely.
  7. Writing legible, comprehensive progress notes, history and physical exams, and prescriptions.
  8. Providing constructive, meaningful feedback to colleagues, course directors, PBL tutors, lecturers, and other members of the educational community.
As measured by achieving a grade of "credit" in all required courses and 4th year electives, and achieving a passing score on the MDED 541 Comprehensive Clinical Skills Assessment, and the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge Examination and the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills Examination.

V.  Populational and Community Health

Graduates will appreciate the epidemiology of disease and the role of the physician in public health and global health issues, particularly those important to Hawaii and the Asia-Pacific region.


When in the clinical or classroom setting, students will appreciate the epidemiology of disease and the role of physicians in populational and community health by:
  1. Stating the epidemiology of common illnesses within diverse populations and the systematic approaches useful in reducing the incidence and prevalence of such illnesses.
  2. Stating the important non-biological determinants of poor health and the economic, psychological, social, and cultural factors that contribute to the development and/or continuation of illness.
  3. Explaining the physicianís role in current Global Health Issues that include emerging infections and pandemics, bioterrorism, and natural disasters.
  4. Stating the important public health measures that support the health of communities.
  5. Stating important legal aspects of medicine.
  6. Caring for patients who are unable to pay and to advocate for access to health care for members of traditionally underserved populations.
  7. Applying common biostatistical tools such as the likelihood ratio, positive and negative predictive values, and the number needed to treat to patient care.
  8. Incorporating principles of quality improvement and systems-based practice in patient care and research.
As measured by achieving a grade of "credit" in all required courses and 4th year electives, and achieving a passing score on the MDED 541 Comprehensive Clinical Skills Assessment, and the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge Examination and the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills Examination.

VI.  Professionalism

Graduates will be professional and ethical, demonstrate an enthusiasm for medicine, and value honor, integrity, altruism, respect, accountability, excellence, scholarship, and leadership while delivering compassionate care to their patients.


When practicing medicine or representing JABSOM outside the classroom or clinical setting, students will exhibit the highest standards of professional and ethical behavior by:
  1. Stating the theories and principles that govern ethical decision-making including those related to the major dilemmas in medicine.
  2. Adhering to JABSOM policies regarding academic integrity, cheating, plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification and to JABSOM and UHM policies regarding student conduct.
  3. Showing respect, honesty, integrity, and humility.
  4. Presenting a professional appearance and demeanor.
  5. Respecting patient confidentiality and preserving patient dignity.
  6. Recognizing potential conflicts of interest inherent in various financial and organizational arrangements in the practice of medicine.
  7. Dealing with professional mistakes openly and honestly in ways that promote patient trust and self-learning.
  8. Acknowledging personal limitations and the need for life-long learning.
  9. Completing school and professional requirements in a timely manner.
  10. Willingly teaching and supporting others.
  11. Participating positively in JABSOM learning opportunities.
  12. Demonstrating respect for diversity and maintaining a safe environment for all.
  13. Incorporating principles of interdisciplinary collaboration, especially in the areas of communication and patient safety.
  14. Demonstrating the ability to reflect and self-assess.
As measured by achieving a grade of "credit" in all required courses and 4th year electives, and achieving a passing score on the MDED 541 Comprehensive Clinical Skills Assessment, and the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Knowledge Examination and the USMLE Step 2 Clinical Skills Examination.

VII.  Personal Health and Well-Being

Graduates will maintain personal health and well-being.


Students will maintain their personal health and well-being by:
  1. Stating strategies to maintain personal physical and mental health.
  2. Stating healthy coping mechanisms to manage stress and exam anxiety.
  3. Stating strategies to maintain personal safety in both academic and clinical environments.
  4. Debriefing critical clinical incidents, such as poor outcomes and mistakes, with colleagues so they can better cope with emotional stresses of clinical practice.
  5. Identifying resources available for treating depression, substance abuse, and other forms of physician impairment.
  6. Recognizing the importance of balancing personal, family, and career goals.Stating strategies to maintain personal physical and mental health.
As measured by their creation of a personal health and well-being plan for the preclerkship, clinical and postgraduate periods of their medical education

Resources

Association of American Medical Colleges. The Medical School Objectives Project:
Report 1 Learning Objectives for Medical Student Education Guidelines for Medical Schools 1998

Association of American Medical Colleges. The Medical School Objectives Project: Report II Contemporary Issues in Medicine:
Medical Informatics and Population Health 1998

Association of American Medical Colleges. The Medical School Objectives Project: Report III Contemporary Issues in Medicine:
Communication in Medicine 1999

Association of American Medical Colleges. Medical School Objectives Project: Report IV Contemporary Issues in Medicine:
Basic Science and Clinical Research 2001

Association of American Medical Colleges. The Medical School Objectives Project: Report V Contemporary Issues in Medicine:
Quality of Care 2001

Association of American Medical Colleges. Medical School Objectives Project: Report VI Contemporary Issues in Medicine:
Genetics Education 2004

Association of American Medical Colleges. Medical School Objectives Project:
Report VII Contemporary Issues in Medicine:
Musculoskeletal Medicine Education 2005

The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. CanMEDS 2005 Physician Competency Framework

American Board of Internal Medicine. Project Professionalism 1995

Liaison Committee on Medical Education. Function and Structure of a Medical School

Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)
Common Program Requirements: General Competencies 2007.


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